Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Ten Spirits 十神 (2) - Resource

The Chinese term is 印 (Yin) which is the seal of authority. In the old days, when someone was assigned an important government post, the emperor would give this person a seal of authority to act on his behalf. This seal offers support to whatever the person does on behalf of the emperor. It makes him strong.

Of course, to be able to get the seal, one must become famous to attract the attention of the emperor. The easiest (and hard) way was to pass the imperial examination with flying colors. The world today has changed a lot. That is why the term is translated as Resource which is an ingredient to support a person. This can be financial resource that comes from his parents. It can also be support from his boss to perform his duties with authority. 

正印 - Proper Resource covers a person's support from his parents in his earlier days, and his boss when he works in a company. If he is self-employed, he can get resource from financial institutes and also his clients. In a democratic country today, the head of state has his authority sourcing from the citizens who are his boss. Without such support by winning an election, he cannot be the president or the prime minister. Proper resource also covers a person's knowledge that is his main support in life. 

偏印 - Unbecoming Resource is support that is acquired through a more or less improper channel. For example, a person can win an election by lies to please the people to become his supporters. He can make promises with no intention to keep. Such behavior can be extended to our everyday lives when we want to gain support from our superiors. Unbecoming Resource is also known as The Wicked God of the Owl 梟神. It will be dealt with later.

It is the way the support comes to a person that distinguishes between the two types of resource. Even in the old days, a government post can be obtained through bribery just like what is happening in countries where corruption is part of daily life. In short you can easily distinguish the two by examining the harmony or disharmony generated.

Joseph Yu

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